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An Open Letter to Google

May 7, 2012

I started to use Google Wave from 2009, when it was just opened to public.  I like the product, which is quite powerful and easy to work with. For over 3 years, I have had over 50 Waves. In each Wave, there are a lot of contents. It includes my class notes, research notes, and programming notes. It even includes a lot of my contact information, which is very important to me.

Today, as 5.7.2012, I want to find one technique about Ruby on Rails. I logged into Wave. What I  found is that the Google Wave server is shut down. To be fair, I know it is not totally Google’s mistake. They have notified users to backup Waves in the end of 2011. I also know Wave is only readable from January of 2012, which i thought it is not a big deal. So from January, I started to worked on Google Doc. I think once I need to use Wave, I just go back to Wave to search among my notes.

I have actually tried to back up all my Waves. But the backup process is quite painful. I have to export single Wave one by one. I have so many Waves. So I stopped to export my Waves.

One reason for me not able to know Wave was already shut down in 4.30.2012 is that I am still in School for my Ph.D. degree, I use my school mail daily, and I have not checked Gmail very often, which is associated with my Wave account. So I have missed all Google’s notices about shutting down Wave server.  But I think this “stay UN-notified of Wave shut down” experience may not just be limited to me.

I am not sure it is just me, I have not expected that a company like Google will shutdown the Wave server totally! Even they shut down the Wave server, they should still give some “slow” users like me some time window, a grace period for them to react. A big company like Google should act more carefully and responsibly. Especially for the important product like Wave, it is a document and technical collaboration center for many people, including me.

If Google can do this for Wave, I am not convinced that Google will not do this for Google Doc in the future. If I put all my documents into Google Doc, I may still end up with losing all my work. The longer I work, the worse loss I will suffer!!

Google, Please be considerate and responsible for all your users!

Whose Economy Has It Worst? – a Reflection

November 14, 2011

Whose Economy Has It Worst link:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204358004577029972941870172.html?mod=WSJ_WSJ_News_BlogsModule#articleTabs%3Darticle

This article is actually among handful articles, which says US has promising future. US has its own problem. China has its too. The fundamental competency between these two countries lies in (1) innovation (2) hard work

If you are innovative enough, you do not have to work hard. Because you are much smarter than others. Others can work for you. NO, work for your brain.

However, if you are not really not that smart, you have to work fairly hard as others, otherwise you will be suffering from being poor and possibly bankrupt.

The third competency may lie in SOUL. But, who knows, what is really a competitive soul.  It is hard to quantify like being smart or working hard.

Chinese definitely can work hard, with low salary. Chinese is not necessarily smarter than American. But at least not stupid than American.  So this maybe able to explain why US government has to borrow money from China.

But Chinese government makes un-smart decisions. Not distributing the huge amount money earning from export to citizens, but manipulating it on the government own decisions such as investing it to infrastructure market, which again cause great inflation.

China Government also has not waken up for its one child policy, which is just equal to killing its own people, kill 10 million  un-born babies per year? Yes, that is very likely be.  In this world, there are not really any countries doing it, or will ever even attempt to do it.

So what is wrong with China? I have put some continuous thoughts into it. All in all, I think this boils down to SOUL. China has a long tradition of being big government. People are used to it, although the pain from it is also huge.

Live with pain. Live in a compromise. Live in a conservative status. Live in an as peaceful as possible environment  — Chinese

Live in a as much as feasible liberal environment. Live for right. Live in a as comfortable as possible life styles —American

Stay tuned for more thoughts!

Building a startup in America: a true story from a foreigner

October 4, 2011

Four years dreaming, couple of times of English tests, three times visa rejection: A beginning

When I boarded the plane flying from Beijing to Virginia in 2004, I have never expected a life, what soever in a country, which I only knew a little but have been always curious for over 4 years.

It is Hollywood movie attracting me to this remote country, the freedom, the endless land, the sunshine, beach, and coast. Back to 90′s, US government did a terrific job in Asia spreading its value: liberal and individualism spirit.

For this goal, I have used all my efforts, preparing for GRE test (2 times, first time 2110/2400, ending with a score 2360/2400) and TOELF ( 3 times, perhaps i just love taking the TOEFL test), being rejected with a Visa for 3 times for over 2 years from 2002 – 2004.   I felt hopeless to get a visa.  I knew the US embassy has a quote. For a single day, there were  only a certain number of Chinese people who can be issued visas.  Reason? I did not really know. I heard from someone that it was all because of 9-11, forcing US government to change its visa policy. At that time, I felt i was clearly a victim of 9-11!

The last try of U.S. visa was on the end July of 2004. In fact, I never expected getting a visa, because I knew visa officer always just simply say: Sorry sir, I can not give you a visa this time, but please come next time!  Unfortunately, even until now, there is not such a thing you can argue with a Visa officer once the decision was made. You only accept their decisions and leave the embassy right away.

Fully aware of this, I just did say anything beside just standing there like a dumb, seemingly waiting for a “NO answer” again from Visa officer.  I even asked myself why i should come here to have another rejection- losing my confidence and courage – perhaps most likely merely for seeking an opportunity to sooth my passion and dream?

Funny enough, on that day, the officer did not ask me the typical questions, which they have asked many many times:

(1) Why you chose this university? What will you study? How do you know this university? What will you do after graduates?

(2) What your parents do in China?  Do you have brothers and sisters?

(3) The list goes on….

What I only can remember is : Sir, I will give you a visa!. From his smile, I knew he was really meant to give me a visa.

Finally, I got a visa, which i have waited for two years.

Because the school would start in no time, I had to quickly buy a ticket two days before i board the plane, leaving no time to say even a goodbye with my parents, my colleagues, and my friends.  My heart was full of sorrow and conflicts…

After 24 hours, finally the plane flied into Virginia. After getting off from the plane, walking into the hallway (far smaller than Beijing airport), I stepped onto the soil of US for the first time after all this turmoil during past several years. A contrast feeling stroke me. In front of my eyes, a scene somehow familiar, with expected clean air and fresh sunshine. At the same time though,  a huge disappointment was arising, a great of missing of home and parents, I have not yet said a Goodbye with  before my leave.

I surprised found out what was waiting for me is such a small yet beautiful town, My Ph.D advisor, who i have only communicated with Emails, sent one of his students Nivrah to pick me up.  Nivrah seemed a nice guy, with slight smile on his face, always shrugging off his shoulder when i asked some “he believed silly” questions about this college town and future research projects.

It took us about an hour to drive from airport to this small college town.  After getting off his car, I started to realize that I had  no where to go but got to stay in Nivrah’s apartment for a while, about five hours.  I went to school, wished to check Email, and came across a graduate student, XingDa,  who came for the same major as me. He arrived much earlier than me.  I told him that I had no where to live and asked a favor from him for whether he knew someone who was still looking for a roommate. I left Nivrah’s phone number to him, since i did not have a phone yet.

About 2 hours later… I got a call from a guy telling me that he has been looking for a roommate. I did not take a single look of the room, saying: Okay, can I move in?

Hometown, 清原县 (Qingyuan, Liao ning, China)

Second Hometown, Roanoke, Virginia

A quick look of InnovationWorks (ChuangXin)

September 1, 2011

Someone may argue ChuangXin (创新工场), also called Innovation (创新) Works (工场) is just a place for copying new IT ideas from US to China.

But is it really? Lets look at a list of incubated companies by Chuangxin or innovationworks based on: http://www.chuangxin.com/portfolio

(1) http://www.dianxinos.com/web/ (smartphone OS)

(2) http://wandoujia.com/feature.html

(3) http://www.umeng.com/ data analysis tool

(4) http://www.jingling.cn/ image processing

(5) http://xingcloud.com/ cloud computing, game cloud

(6) http://www.appchina.com/ android app store

(7) http://leiyoo.com/ HTML5 for mobile

(8) http://diandian.com/ blog

(9) http://zhihu.com/ QA

(10) http://www.looa.com/ very early stage, social e-Commerical

(11) http://www.buding.cn/ order food from westernized food chain stores like Pizzahut

From this portfolio, it seems Chuangxin has not really incubated any companies, which invented dramatic new ideas. Some of these companies are indeed similar to existing ones in US like diandian.

But fair to say, within 3 years, ChuangXin has done tremendous work, incubated 11 companies. Some of these companies such as looa and dianxinos are very interesting.

Want to get your startup running? TC Disrupt may help you

April 29, 2011

Probbaly you know TechCrunch, one of most famous Tech sites in US. You may also know they have constantly done hard work on reporting and tracking startups, in particular the early or middle stage startups.

TC holds disrupt meeting(s) every year. Some successful startups  such as Qwiki has attracted a lot of investors’ attention due to the TC disrupt.

Today, TC just make a big reward to someones who are interested in attending NYC TC disrupt. What you need to do is to love their Facebook page and leave comments on their post and probably tweet their post.  This is their post. Do not MISS it!

http://techcrunch.com/2011/04/29/techcrunch-giveaway-a-free-ticket-to-disrupt-nyc-techcrunch/

Open systems do not always win

October 20, 2010

Competition…, is good!

It seems Jobs quote can really stir some waves in the water. This time it is also true. In Monday, Jobs just made another famous quote:

Open systems do not always win.

Android Leader, Andy Rubin responded with another famous technical quote:

the definition of open: “mkdir android ; cd android ; repo init -u git://android.git.kernel.org/platform/manifest.git ; repo sync ; make”

Really? Lets take a look a simple statistics. So will Jobs has to worry about the competition from Android?

One of best: Twitter’s message queue tool Kestrel

October 17, 2010

Good is not enough!

If you are an active Twitter user, you probably experienced the fail of Tweet update very often.  But from time to time, such fail is less than before.

This progress is attributed to the new Message queue tool Kestrel, which is done by Robey Pointer. Kestrel is implement by Scala, which is boasted as one of best language for scale, typing.

The fundamental of Kestrel is very similar to starling, also a Message queue tool implemented by Ruby. It is said the Ruby garbage collection caused the problems of starling. As such, starling is being replaced by Kestrel in Twitter.

Twitter blog said the performance of Kestrel is as good as the Google’s Cache money, which is done by Nick Kallen, also working in Twitter now!

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